Moving to Australia - You+Aus

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You+Aus helps you move to Australia for an exciting healthcare career.

You+Aus helps you move to Australia for an exciting healthcare career.

Where to Start

There are a lot of unknowns when you decide to live and work in another country. And a lot to learn before you go. Don’t worry — we’ve got you covered. You+Aus (You and Aus) helps you with the entire ‘big move’ checklist, including AHPRA registration, visas, job requirements, accommodation and pay expectations. We’re here to answer all the questions: where to live, what it’s like working in Aus, and where to start.

 

requirements

Requirements vary depending on your area of expertise, but generally, you will need:

  • A current or pending AHPRA registration*
  • A valid working visa
  • A minimum of 12 months of experience (2 years+ for sponsorship)
  • Experience in your desired areas of specialty (for example ICU or emergency)

Visas

Applying for a visa can be confusing, but we can help you apply for the one that suits you best.

working holiday Visa

A temporary visa for young people who want to holiday and work in Australia. Usually for up to 12 months and can be extended to a second year visa if you decide to stay.

More details

 

Temporary Skills Shortage Visa 482

An employer sponsors a suitable skilled worker to fill a position they can’t find an Australian to fill.

More details

 

Temporary Skills Visa 186

This visa lets skilled workers who are nominated by their employer to live and work in Australia permanently.

More details

 

Student Visa

Visit Australia to study a healthcare profession which is recognised in Australia. While studying you can work with one of our agencies as an AIN or support worker (skill dependent).

More details

living in
australia

Here’s some important information to know before you head to Australia. 

Tax information

You+Aus requires all nurses to submit their Tax File Number (TFN). For those coming from overseas, or those who are in Australia on a working holiday, You+Aus will provide you with the TFN Application Form. Taxes will be deducted from your weekly pay and this will be based on the approved scale. For more information, check with the Australian Taxation Office. 

Superannuation

All You+Aus members will receive the Superannuation Standard Choice form so you can select your fund or retirement savings account. Find more information on superannuation payments on the Australian Taxation Office website. 

Health Insurance

The Australian Government has signed Reciprocal Health Care Agreements (RHCA) with the United Kingdom, the Republic of Ireland, New Zealand, Sweden, the Netherlands, Finland, Belgium, Norway, Slovenia, Malta and Italy. If you have a passport from one of these countries, you might be entitled to access Medicare, Australia’s healthcare service. It is recommended that all overseas visitors take out private health insurance. 

Banking

Most Australian banks make it simple for foreigners to open a bank account. Many banks let you open an account online or over the phone, so you don’t have to be in the country to set it up. You can open a bank account up to three months before you move to Australia. 

Networking

Set yourself up for success before you arrive. If you have friends in Australia, let them know you’re coming and get some local intel. Maybe you can crash on a friend’s couch for a few days when you arrive, or someone might know about a good hostel. If you don’t have any contacts, don’t worry – look online for ex-pat meet-ups in your destination city. 

Accomodation

Make sure you’ve got somewhere to stay BEFORE you find a flat/apartment. Arrange to stay with friends, or find a decent backpackers or hotel. Sites like Hostelworld and HotelsCombined are handy for comparing prices.  

What to pack

What to pack will depend on the time of year, which city you’re heading to and how long you plan to stay. It’s more tropical in the north of the country and can get downright chilly in the south, so do your research before you pack. Here are some things to keep handy:

• Insect repellent 

• Sunglasses and sunhat 

• Bathing suit (also known as boardies/togs/cozzie/swimmers/bathers – all local variations!) 

• Sunscreen SPF 30+ minimum. The sun is fierce in Australia! 

• Walking shoes 

• Light summer clothes 

• A warm jacket (you will need it) 

Urban + Rural

Australia is large and diverse, with each city and state
offering unique benefits and lifestyle qualities.

Sydney
Living in Sydney

Like most major international cities, Sydney can be pricey if you want to live it up with harbour views and rooftop cocktail bars. Things become a whole lot more affordable if you move further out or live in one of the inner-city suburbs which are lively, eclectic and probably more fun. And, just like at home, don’t forget to factor in the costs of utilities, mobile phone, groceries, public transport and entertainment when you’re crunching the numbers before you make the move.

 

Getting around

Sydney is an incredibly liveable city with plenty of trains, light rails, metro rails, public buses, and ferries that all run (pretty) reliably. Just get yourself an Opal card or use your debit card to pay your way. There are also plenty of cabs and rideshares. It’s a beautiful and walkable city, but it can be hilly, so your legs will get a workout. Traffic can get incredibly heavy, and is a popular topic of conversation.

Lifestyle

The Sydney lifestyle is all about fun in the sun, from a refreshing morning swim in the ocean baths at Icebergs to walking the beachside cliffs at Bronte. With a warm, mild climate, it’s a stunner of a city, with a scenic harbour, a seaside fishmarket, happening inner-city suburbs and big, broad city parks. It also gets a lot of Australia’s major events, from blockbuster art exhibitions to theatre productions and festivals like the Sydney Food and Wine Festival and Mardi Gras.

It’s a diverse city with multicultural communities putting their stamp on Sydney’s exciting food scene and, when the sun goes down, the streets of Newtown, Erskineville, Surry Hills and Darlinghurst light up. Having such a diverse population means it’s easier to meet up with ex-pats – you’ll find a strong sense of community there and you’ll quickly feel like Sydney is a home away from home.

Sydney is Australia’s biggest city so there are plenty of employment opportunities both in the CBD and the sprawling surrounds. You could end up with an exciting and varied career in one of the world’s most photogenic cities.

Melbourne
Living in Melbourne

Often ranked one of the world’s most liveable cities, Melbourne is all style. It has a world-renowned street art scene and incredible food, and it’s a city that takes its coffee very seriously. The city centre is a mix of grand Victorian buildings, sleek skyscrapers and a network of hidden laneways full of secret bars and noodle joints. The CBD is full of high rise apartments, while the suburbs offer more spacious alternatives. And, just like at home, don’t forget to factor in the costs of utilities, mobile phone, groceries, public transport and entertainment to your budget before you make the move.

 

Getting around

Melbourne is very easy to get around, with public trains, trams and buses covering the city and surrounds. The city centre is an ultra-walkable, easy-to-navigate grid covered by the ‘free tram zone’. The city centre is surrounded by very cool inner-city suburbs and most tram and train lines get you there quickly. Taxis and rideshares are also available, as well as hire bikes and scooters.

Melbourne is big on bike-riding, and there’s 160 km of bike lanes to explore. It’s also a very easy city to drive around (just beware the dreaded ‘hook turn’), especially if you have to reach the outer suburbs. A suite of snappy freeways sync up to make your commute super-efficient.

Lifestyle

Cool climate Melbourne is a vibrant and multicultural city that loves its live music, art, food, and sport, so you’re just as likely to get caught in a football crowd as a film festival gathering. The Yarra River runs through the centre of this pretty city, and its banks are lined with al fresco restaurants. Explore a bit further afield and you’ll find hipster neighbourhoods like Brunswick and Northcote, beachy good times in St Kilda, fun bars in Windsor and a taste of Vietnam in Richmond. And if you’ve heard the rumour about Melbourne’s famous ‘four seasons in one day’ weather – it’s true.

Brisbane
Living in Brisbane

Brisbane is Australia’s third most populous city and the capital of Queensland. Due to the hot, subtropical climate, Brisbane enjoys pleasant average temperatures all year round. Living in Brisbane means jumping into one of Australia’s tourist hotspots, packed with leisure, culture and natural beauty.

 

Getting around

Public transport in the Brisbane metropolitan area is provided by Translink, which runs the buses, boats and catamarans to the outlying islands and the train lines. Once you’ve found a place to live, you can use the Translink online journey planner to work out your daily commute. You can buy a ticket onboard or an electronic ‘go card’, which is pre-loaded and easily topped up. The go cards make public transport considerably cheaper.

Lifestyle

With its mellow, tropical weather and the Brisbane River weaving its way through the city, Brisbane offers all the advantages of urban city living with a resort lifestyle. There’s even a beach in the city, called Streets Beach.

Take in picturesque views by walking, hiking or cycling to the top of nearby Mount Coot-Tha on the edge of town, or choose the cultural route at the Queensland Museum, the Performing Arts Centre and the Gallery of Modern Art. Along with the Brisbane Powerhouse, this collection of spaces forms a vibrant contemporary arts scene that draws thousands of tourists to the city.

Expats living in Brisbane can also take advantage of its location as the gateway to Queensland’s beautiful hinterland and the Scenic Rim, the city’s World Heritage-Listed backyard. The hinterland’s mountain ranges and lush rainforests make it a must-visit destination for hikers and eco-tourists.

Sydney
Living in Sydney

Like most major international cities, Sydney can be pricey if you want to live it up with harbour views and rooftop cocktail bars. Things become a whole lot more affordable if you move further out or live in one of the inner-city suburbs which are lively, eclectic and probably more fun. And, just like at home, don’t forget to factor in the costs of utilities, mobile phone, groceries, public transport and entertainment when you’re crunching the numbers before you make the move.

 

Getting around

Sydney is an incredibly liveable city with plenty of trains, light rails, metro rails, public buses, and ferries that all run (pretty) reliably. Just get yourself an Opal card or use your debit card to pay your way. There are also plenty of cabs and rideshares. It’s a beautiful and walkable city, but it can be hilly, so your legs will get a workout. Traffic can get incredibly heavy, and is a popular topic of conversation.

Lifestyle

The Sydney lifestyle is all about fun in the sun, from a refreshing morning swim in the ocean baths at Icebergs to walking the beachside cliffs at Bronte. With a warm, mild climate, it’s a stunner of a city, with a scenic harbour, a seaside fishmarket, happening inner-city suburbs and big, broad city parks. It also gets a lot of Australia’s major events, from blockbuster art exhibitions to theatre productions and festivals like the Sydney Food and Wine Festival and Mardi Gras.

It’s a diverse city with multicultural communities putting their stamp on Sydney’s exciting food scene and, when the sun goes down, the streets of Newtown, Erskineville, Surry Hills and Darlinghurst light up. Having such a diverse population means it’s easier to meet up with ex-pats – you’ll find a strong sense of community there and you’ll quickly feel like Sydney is a home away from home.

Sydney is Australia’s biggest city so there are plenty of employment opportunities both in the CBD and the sprawling surrounds. You could end up with an exciting and varied career in one of the world’s most photogenic cities.

Wagga Wagga
Living in Wagga Wagga

Smack bang between Melbourne and Sydney you’ll find the lively regional town of Wagga Wagga on the banks of the Murrumbidgee River (try saying that five times fast.) Wagga Wagga is a vibrant town, with three university campuses and other training centres, so it draws a younger crowd. It’s in the heart of the Riverina district, so day trips to explore this gorgeous region are a must. The weather is generally warm, with four distinct seasons, and the cost of living is reasonable, especially considering the lifestyle of river swims, cellar door tastings and a busy festival calendar.

Getting around

Wagga Wagga is about five hours drive to Melbourne or Sydney and three to Canberra, so if you want the flexibility of weekend road trips, buying or hiring a car could be worth investigating. Getting around Wagga Wagga itself is pretty easy with the Busabout service, but depending on where you end up working, a car might offer more flexibility.

Lifestyle

Wagga Wagga is one of those regional towns that’s really thriving. Think hipster cafes and laneway art. It offers an incredible food scene — the Riverina is known for its local produce and wineries — great galleries and lovely botanic gardens. Head to Wagga Beach for a river swim and a picnic on the sand or tackle the 42-kilometre Wiradjuri Trail, just outside the city. Within the city, there are plenty of stores for whatever you need – head to Wagga Marketplace or Sturt Mall for all your major retailers. There’s also a chock-a-block calendar of festivals, events and markets to really embrace the spirit of Wagga Wagga.

Coffs Harbour
Living in Coffs Harbour

Coffs Harbour, on the mid-north coast of New South Wales, is a beachside, artsy town with a laidback vibe and a warm, mild climate. It’s just under six hours’ drive north of Sydney and is one of the largest urban centres on the North Coast. It’s right by the ocean, so you can enjoy that beachy lifestyle before and after work. Healthcare and social assistance is one of the area’s largest industries, and there are many employment opportunities in this growing sector. The cost of living is affordable and you can choose to live by the water, in the city or in the boutique-y village of Sawtell.

Getting around

The centre of Coffs Harbour is small and walkable, but if you’re living further out, you’ll have to look at other alternatives. Local bus operators run regular daily services throughout the region, and there are taxis and hire cars, as well as bus tours to nearby attractions. Depending on where you decide to live, driving might be the easiest option.

Lifestyle

Coffs Harbour has that coastal village feel but with a creative edge, and it’s been designated as an eco-friendly destination. Flying in and seeing the turquoise ocean and the scalloped shoreline will make you relax instantly, even if you’re here to work. The city centre is a pleasant shopping area with a mix of chain stores and family businesses, with good supermarkets and a range of restaurants.

Coffs Harbour can offer a great work-life balance. You can swim at Jetty Beach, then pick up some seafood plucked fresh from the ocean. Enjoy locally roasted coffee in a backlane warehouse café or post-work margaritas at the local Mexican eatery. One of the most exciting parts of being in Coffs Harbour is seeing thousands of humpback whales migrating north. There are subtropical rainforests to explore, hip neighbourhoods to discover and, the kitschiest icon of them all – the Big Banana.

Newcastle
Living in Newcastle

Just two hours outside of Sydney, Newcastle offers cosmopolitan coastal living without the big city hassle — or the price tag, as this city is a lot more affordable than its big neighbour. Known for its street art, surf beaches and ocean baths, Newcastle offers all the advantages of a city with the relaxing benefits of the beach.

With a vibrant food and culture scene and a pretty city centre of historic buildings and modern galleries, choosing to settle in Newcastle guarantees a great lifestyle. Even after you’ve factored in the cost of your transport, groceries, mobile plans and dining out, you’ll find Newcastle pretty budget-friendly.

Getting around

As a relatively compact city, your daily commute will rarely be longer than 30 minutes. With a network of trains, buses, ferries, coaches and taxis, you can get around the area and the larger region easily. Get a pre-paid Opal card if you’re going to use public transport regularly; it’s a cheaper and easier way to go.

Lifestyle

Whether you’re staying in the centre of Newcastle or opting for a quieter area like nearby Maitland or Lake Macquarie, a relaxing after-work swim is always on the cards, especially given Newcastle’s warm climate. Don’t miss the historic Newcastle Ocean Baths and the ANZAC Memorial Walk, which takes in the picturesque coastline and is a great way to get your steps in. There are also lovely parks and sanctuaries nearby for a nature fix.

Newcastle has all the facilities and amenities of bigger cities, so you’ll never be short of a micro-brewery, a restaurant, a live music venue or a theatre for entertainment. There’s plenty of good shopping to be had too.

Geelong
Living in Geelong

Geelong is located on the shores of Corio Bay and is surrounded by beautiful natural scenery. The city is also located within easy reach of the Great Ocean Road, the Surf Coast and the Bellarine Peninsula.

Compared to Melbourne, Geelong has a lower cost of living, making it an attractive option for those looking for a more affordable lifestyle. Housing prices are generally lower in Geelong, and there are many options available for people at different income levels.

 

Geelong
Getting Around

Geelong has a comprehensive bus network operated by McHarry’s Buslines, which covers most of the city and its surrounding suburbs. The buses offer regular and frequent services, making it easy to get around the city.

The city is connected to Melbourne via a train line that runs from Geelong to Southern Cross Station. The train service is operated by V/Line and offers a comfortable and convenient way to travel between the two cities.

Geelong is a bike-friendly city, with dedicated bike lanes and paths throughout the city. Bicycles can be hired from various locations throughout the city, including the Geelong train station.

Lifestyle

Geelong offers all the amenities you need for a comfortable lifestyle, including good schools, quality healthcare facilities, shopping centres, restaurants, and cultural attractions. There are also many parks and open spaces to enjoy.

With a strong sense of community, including a range of events and festivals throughout the year. The city also has a strong sporting culture, with local teams in the AFL, A-League, and NBL.

 

Melbourne
Living in Melbourne

Often ranked one of the world’s most liveable cities, Melbourne is all style. It has a world-renowned street art scene and incredible food, and it’s a city that takes its coffee very seriously. The city centre is a mix of grand Victorian buildings, sleek skyscrapers and a network of hidden laneways full of secret bars and noodle joints. The CBD is full of high rise apartments, while the suburbs offer more spacious alternatives. And, just like at home, don’t forget to factor in the costs of utilities, mobile phone, groceries, public transport and entertainment to your budget before you make the move.

 

Getting around

Melbourne is very easy to get around, with public trains, trams and buses covering the city and surrounds. The city centre is an ultra-walkable, easy-to-navigate grid covered by the ‘free tram zone’. The city centre is surrounded by very cool inner-city suburbs and most tram and train lines get you there quickly. Taxis and rideshares are also available, as well as hire bikes and scooters.

Melbourne is big on bike-riding, and there’s 160 km of bike lanes to explore. It’s also a very easy city to drive around (just beware the dreaded ‘hook turn’), especially if you have to reach the outer suburbs. A suite of snappy freeways sync up to make your commute super-efficient.

Lifestyle

Cool climate Melbourne is a vibrant and multicultural city that loves its live music, art, food, and sport, so you’re just as likely to get caught in a football crowd as a film festival gathering. The Yarra River runs through the centre of this pretty city, and its banks are lined with al fresco restaurants. Explore a bit further afield and you’ll find hipster neighbourhoods like Brunswick and Northcote, beachy good times in St Kilda, fun bars in Windsor and a taste of Vietnam in Richmond. And if you’ve heard the rumour about Melbourne’s famous ‘four seasons in one day’ weather – it’s true.

Brisbane
Living in Brisbane

Brisbane is Australia’s third most populous city and the capital of Queensland. Due to the hot, subtropical climate, Brisbane enjoys pleasant average temperatures all year round. Living in Brisbane means jumping into one of Australia’s tourist hotspots, packed with leisure, culture and natural beauty.

 

Getting around

Public transport in the Brisbane metropolitan area is provided by Translink, which runs the buses, boats and catamarans to the outlying islands and the train lines. Once you’ve found a place to live, you can use the Translink online journey planner to work out your daily commute. You can buy a ticket onboard or an electronic ‘go card’, which is pre-loaded and easily topped up. The go cards make public transport considerably cheaper.

Lifestyle

With its mellow, tropical weather and the Brisbane River weaving its way through the city, Brisbane offers all the advantages of urban city living with a resort lifestyle. There’s even a beach in the city, called Streets Beach.

Take in picturesque views by walking, hiking or cycling to the top of nearby Mount Coot-Tha on the edge of town, or choose the cultural route at the Queensland Museum, the Performing Arts Centre and the Gallery of Modern Art. Along with the Brisbane Powerhouse, this collection of spaces forms a vibrant contemporary arts scene that draws thousands of tourists to the city.

Expats living in Brisbane can also take advantage of its location as the gateway to Queensland’s beautiful hinterland and the Scenic Rim, the city’s World Heritage-Listed backyard. The hinterland’s mountain ranges and lush rainforests make it a must-visit destination for hikers and eco-tourists.

Gold Coast
Living on the Gold Coast

The Gold Coast is known for endless, sandy beaches, surfing spots, inland canals and beautiful rainforests. It’s warm and sunny all year round, and tourists flock to hotspots like Surfers Paradise and Broadbeach. The beaches are edged with high rise apartments which offer some of the best sunrises before you head off to work. Living on the Gold Coast is pretty affordable, with a range of accommodation options.

 

Getting around

TransLink bus, train and tram network includes the G:link trams, Surfside Buslines and Queensland Rail. Head to TransLink’s website and use their journey planner to work out the most efficient route to work. If you’re going to use public transport regularly, it’s easier to get a preloaded ‘go card’ (which includes travelling on trains) or a Gold Coast ‘go explore’ card. While the public transport is quite good, it doesn’t cover the entire region, so hiring a car is often the most flexible option; daily rates can be quite affordable, especially if you book in advance.

Lifestyle

With warm, sunny weather all year round, living and working on the Gold Coast is a pretty relaxing affair. You can enjoy beach yoga classes at sunrise or a post-work seaside cocktail. It’s a very tourist-oriented area, with families flocking to theme parks such as Warner Bros. Movie World and Wet’n’Wild, but you can also enjoy nature-oriented adventures in the surrounding hinterland.

Go hiking in Lamington National Park or meet the local wildlife in the 27-hectare Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary. On a day-to-day basis, the Gold Coast has no shortage of pubs, bars, restaurants, beach parties, free events, live music and markets.

Cairns
Living in Cairns

Cairns can deliver the best of both worlds – city attractions and natural beauty, with the Great Barrier Reef right on its doorstep. It’s situated way up in Far North Queensland, so be prepared for the tropical weather – we’re talking hot, humid, and sticky. Summer (roughly December to February) is considered the ‘wet season’, bringing heavy rainfall, so pack an umbrella, even though it’s hot. Winter (June to August) is much more pleasant, with dry, mild weather (and a lot of tourists).

Compared to places like Melbourne or Sydney, Cairns is a much more affordable place, with its cost of living more on par with other regional centres. Just don’t forget to factor in the costs of utilities, mobile phone, groceries, public transport and entertainment when you’re working out your budget for living in Cairns.

Getting around

Sunbus, TransLink’s public bus service, operates throughout Cairns, running from the northern beaches to the southern suburbs. Head to the TransLink Cairns website for routes and fares, or use the MyTranslink app. If you want to travel further afield, there are long distance and interstate coaches that run from the central depot on the Cairns Esplanade, or you can catch the Spirit of Queensland train for a scenic journey that takes you all the way from Cairns down to Brisbane. Alternatively, hiring or buying a car will give you more flexibility for exploring or getting to work.

Lifestyle

Cairns (pronounced ‘cans’) is a tourist town, thanks to its proximity to the Great Barrier Reef and all the natural attractions of Far North Queensland, so expect to see lots of resorts, boats, souvenir shops and backpacker hostels when you arrive. But as a place to live, it’s relaxed and casual with a good quality of life that mixes a city feel with a nature-heavy vibe. There’s the Esplanade Lagoon to cool off in, and piers full of waterfront dining options. There’s also a host of cultural institutions here too, including the Cairns Performing Arts Centre, the Civic Theatre and the Cairns Museum and Art Gallery.

You’re on the doorstep of magical, ancient rainforests as well as that stunning reef, so living in Cairns really does give you the ultimate work-life balance.

Central QLD
Living in Central Queensland

Central Queensland is exactly as it sounds – a central band of the state that covers the towns of Rockhampton and Gladstone as well as the Central Highlands. Like much of the top half of Queensland, this is hot and humid climate but is also home to incredible natural beauty and some lively resort towns.

Being away from major cities means this area is relatively affordable, but don’t forget to factor in transport costs if you’re working somewhere remote.

Getting around

TransLink is Queensland’s public transport network of buses and trains. Sunbus operate the buses in Rockhampton while CDC operate the buses in Gladstone. You can buy a ticket as you go or buy a smart card that you can top up if you find you’re using public transport regularly. This works out to be a lot cheaper than buying individual tickets. Central Queensland is a vast area so hiring or buying a car might be your most flexible option if you decide to live and work in the region. Hire cars can be quite affordable if you book in advance.

Lifestyle

If you base yourself in Rockhampton for work, you can expect a mix of jaw-dropping natural beauty and urban convenience. Hit those world-class mountain bike trails and treetop boardwalks, explore ancient caves and delve into our First Nations experiences. Lose yourself in amazing art collections, soak up the heritage architecture then bar-hop through the city’s breweries, watering holes and restaurants.

Take a day trip to the Southern Great Barrier Reef and see why it’s one of the wonders of the world. If you’re based in Gladstone, you’re not far from the Great Barrier Reef islands and lagoons as well as stunning national parks. You can stay in a laidback, coastal village or the hinterlands for more rural living.

In the Central Highlands, a three-hour drive from Rockhampton, it’s all about rural beauty and a break from city living. And, if you’re missing the urban life, there are direct flights to Brisbane and the Sunshine Coast from the Central Highlands.

Mackay
Living in Mackay

The riverside township of Mackay in Queensland offers a lovely, laidback lifestyle. Australia has some of the most beautiful beaches in the world and Mackay is the perfect example. The town is surrounded by 31 spectacular beaches – head for Bucasia, Dolphin Heads and Eimeo Beaches for starters.

Mackay has a humid subtropical climate of hot, wet summers and dry, mild winters. It’s definitely more affordable to live in a place like Mackay compared to Australia’s big cities – just factor in utilities as you’ll be cranking that air conditioning in summer.

Getting around

Mackay Transit Coaches run public bus services throughout Mackay and the surrounding suburbs, including the Northern Beaches, Walkerston and Sarina. Have a look at the Queensland Rail website for train services around the region. As with many regional centres, public transport is not as widely used as in larger cities, so map out where you’ll be living and working as it might be more user-friendly to hire or buy a car. Daily hire car rates can be especially affordable if you book in advance.

Lifestyle

Mackay is a mix of riverside relaxation, amazing Art Deco buildings, good restaurants and beach beauty. Start exploring the city at Bluewater Quay, and its collection of public art, then follow the banks of the Pioneer River and stop for coffee at one of the river-side cafes before going for a swim at Bluewater Lagoon. Caneland Central is Mackay’s main shopping centre, and you’ll find most major retailers there.

If architecture is your thing, you’ll love the impressive Art Deco streetscapes in the CBD, built after the Great Cyclone of 1918. For a bit of Mackay glamour, check out the luxury yachts anchored at Mackay’s modern marina and sip a sunset drink along the palm-lined promenade. Just a five-minute drive from the city centre is Town Beach, famous for its magical sunrises and water views.

Broome
Living in Broome

Broome, in the northwest corner of the country, lies in the sprawling state of Western Australia. It’s a thriving tourist destination with a relaxed pace and a beach resort feel.

Broome is the perfect place to spend your downtime swimming, soaking up the sunshine, or catching up with friends over good food and coffee. The weather is warm all year, with a tropical climate. Summer is the wet season, which gets very hot and humid, while the dry season brings clear skies and milder temperatures. Just make sure you stay hydrated and don’t forget the 50+ sunscreen because Australia’s sun can be pretty intense if you’re not used to it!

There are good employment opportunities in Broome and the cost of living is pretty reasonable. Many people move to Broome for the dry season or come to the Kimberley for seasonal work.

Getting around

There’s a local bus service that runs every day, with a more frequent timetable during the peak season. Broome is nice and flat so it’s good for walking and cycling, with many bike hire businesses around. If you prefer air conditioned comfort, you might prefer to hire a car and drive to work or call a taxi. Once you’re in Broome, it’s expensive to fly out, so keep this in mind when budgeting.

Lifestyle

If you love the beach, you should think about living and working in Broome. It has some of the most beautiful beaches in the world, and, with great weather all year, you can really soak up that beach lifestyle. Cable Beach is one of the most famous in the area, stretching along the coast for 22km. With white sands and crystal clear water, its sunsets create an amazing backdrop. Broome’s historic Chinatown overlooks Roebuck Bay, where you can take a breezy brunch cruise or enjoy an al fresco lunch at one of the waterside cafes. Broome also has plenty of galleries, showcasing local artists and some good shopping malls to pick up anything you need.

Explore the remarkable landscapes and spectacular gorges of the Kimberley Ranges and discover one of Earth’s great wilderness areas.

Kalgoorlie
Living in Kalgoorlie

Kalgoorlie, a six-hour drive north-east of Perth, is a relaxed Western Australian town with wide-open spaces and wondrous skies. Camp in the red-dust land or go fishing on scenic waterholes. There are a number of industries here, but mining is the big one, so you’ll see the town go in cycles throughout the year, with workers coming and going.

The weather does get hot and humid, so keep hydrated and make sure the sunscreen and insect repellant are handy. Enclosed shoes all year round are a must too. It does get cold at night in winter, so remember to bring something warm. It’s an affordable place to live and you’ll find yourself saving money as you soak up the outdoor lifestyle that comes completely free.

Choosing to live and work in Kalgoorlie will be a unique and memorable experience.

Getting around

Kalgoorlie’s town centre is nice and flat so it’s easy to walk or cycle around – you can hire a bike if you don’t have one. There’s a bus service run by TransGoldfields, taxis, and hire cars. Depending on where you work, a hire car might be the most comfortable option, although there’s a regional bus service that goes from Kalgoorlie to surrounding towns.

Lifestyle

Kalgoorlie is a fascinating outback town, with its mix of gold rush history, springtime wildflowers and colonial architecture. There are also the everyday things you’ll need — plenty of restaurants, and good supermarkets – but it’s the natural beauty that will grab you. Climb to the top of Mount Charlotte and catch a sunset over the entire Kalgoorlie township and beyond. The Super Pit, one of Australia’s biggest gold mines, is an iconic place to visit. Or, if you want a slice of tranquil greenery, pack a picnic and relax at Hammond Park.

The Western Australian coastline is just a couple of hours away, so you can always take a day trip or a weekender if you’re in the mood for some ocean time. There are plenty of sporting facilities here, so joining a sports club is a great way to meet people. Kalgoorlie also hosts many festivals and events celebrating First Nations peoples to better understand the local culture.

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